Employee Engagement Starts Before You Even Hire Someone

Employee engagement is lacking in the workforce. According to one survey, only 13 percent of workers are currently actively engaged in their jobs. That leaves a whopping 87 percent of people who dislike the work they’re doing.

Scary thought: Among this 87 percent, some are working for your company.

Many people who are showing up simply for a paycheck might have one foot out the door already. And everyone knows high turnover is a business killer.

People often display interest during a job interview and have the qualifications you’re looking for in a job, so where does it go wrong? Below are some common hiring mistakes you would be wise to avoid.

Mistake #1: Overvaluing resumes

Resumes show what someone has done, not how good they were at doing it.
Put more energy into uncovering strengths and limitations so you can see how well those motivations line up with the job duties. Hiring managers and HR leaders should also strive to identify how well applicants might fit into the company’s culture as well.

Doing this takes an integrated approach to hiring. Incorporate behavioral interviewing, people analytics, and pre-employment assessments into the process.

By being more strategic, you will increase your chances of hiring the right person (i.e., the person who is engaged by the work). By the way, the information you glean can come back around when it’s time to look for future leaders and high-potentials.

Mistake #2: Lack of onboarding

It’s finally over. No more resumes, no more interviews. No more lost productivity. No more spending time, money, and resources searching for someone to fill the void. You made the hire!

What some managers do next is check “done” and move onto the next task. But do you know what is just as important for retention and engagement as making the right hire? The new employee’s first 90 days. That’s the make or break period for integrating them into the company culture, crafting a development plan, and providing the tools necessary for success.

Managers should take the time to understand their new employee’s work style, determine how manager and employee can work together most effectively, and figure out how that employee can best complement the team effort. When new hires see that the organization is invested in their growth and success, they will feel more valued, more engaged, and more inclined toward loyalty.

Mistake #3: Thinking turnover is inevitable

If 87 percent of Americans are disengaged from their work, leaders must take steps to increase the passion level by collaborating with workers on customized career plans based on an individual’s personal strengths and goals. Whether this involves stretch assignments, problem-solving work groups, a promotion, or simply maintaining good, open communication, it’s within your power to reduce turnover, stop brain drain, and save money.

Leaders need not fear the jarring numbers that indicate a wide swath of employees who are not satisfied in their job, because the issue is both preventable and repairable.

To learn more about Caliper and special discounts to NAWLA members, visit www.calipercorp.com/nawla

Caliper is a human capital analytics company leveraging decades of data and validated assessments to predict and select high-quality candidates. Caliper partners with all types of organizations, industries, and sectors – from Fortune 500 companies to small businesses and from government agencies to non-profits. We help companies reduce the risk of bad hiring decisions; build high-performing teams; and engage, develop, and retain their employees. Contact us to learn more.

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